Month: February 2012

Feb 20 2012

Husband And Wife VC Posts Of The Day

Fred Wilson (USV) and Joanne Wilson (Gotham Gal) have the two best posts up today. Each one involved another person.

Fred’s post – The Management Team – Guest Post By Jerry Colonna – is by – wait for it – Jerry Colonna. If you don’t know Jerry, you are missing out. Jerry was Fred’s partner at Flatiron Partners and an amazing VC in the 1990’s. I had the joy of being on several boards with Jerry and can’t think of anyone I’ve ever worked with who understands people better. Jerry’s post wraps up Fred’s MBA Monday series on the management team and is a dynamite finish to an excellent post.

Not to be outdone, Joanne Wilson has a great post up titled Caren Maio, Nest.io, Woman Entrepreneur. It’s part of Joanne’s Women Entrepreneur Monday’s series and highlights Caren Maio, CEO of Nest.io, and a member of the first TechStars New York program. Caren is spectacular and Joanne does a nice job of explaining Nest.io while shining a bright light on the awesomeness that is Caren.

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Feb 16 2012

How Do I Get A Job In A Venture Capital Firm?

In 2008 my partner Seth Levine wrote what I think is the definitive post about how to get a job in venture capital. His post followed an insightful earlier post of his that he wrote in 2005 titled how to become a venture capitalist. Each post is required reading for anyone interested in a job at a venture capital firm.

I get asked this question at least twice a week and use Yesware to send out an automated answer that includes a link to Seth’s post. Today, I noticed a new post from Alex Taussig (Highland Capital Partners) titled 3 ways to land a job in VC. It’s a good addition to the two posts that Seth previously wrote.

I always notice that the number of inquiries I get for jobs at Foundry Group increases in February and March as all the second year business school students in the US start looking for a gig. My advice – read the three posts and start your search a lot earlier.

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Feb 15 2012

Takatkah: The Next Big Thing in VC

Today’s VC Post of the Day is from Ahmed Takatkah, a VC in Jordan titled The Next Big Thing in VC. He starts with a question and the answer he often gets.

“What’s the next big thing in VC?” Whenever I see a VC from the states or even from the region, I ask this question, but none of them gave me a satisfying answer. I will share my answer here and hope that this will stimulate others to comment with different point of view.”

He starts by explaining what he thinks has been happening: Faster Exits, Active Private Capital Markets, The Rise of Accelerators, and Changes in the VC Model and then goes on to predict (and explain) a few new ideas of what might happen: Elevators, Carry Options for Entrepreneurs, Capture Capital, and Cafe Startups.

It’s good stuff and worth reading if you wonder what “the next big thing is VC” is.

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Feb 3 2012

What Should I Do When Someone Expresses Interest In Acquiring My Company?

I get asked this question many times in many different ways. Sometimes people are coy about it (“someone is expressing strategic interest – what should I do?”) other times people are clear and direct (“someone wants to acquire my company – help!”).

David Cohen, the CEO of TechStars, has encountered this many times. Before starting TechStars, he was an entrepreneur who sold his company to a public company after running it with a partner for a decade. He then started a few more companies, including one that failed and one that was acquired. Finally, he started TechStars and of the 28 companies from the first three programs (there have now been 126 companies that have gone through the program to date) 8 have been acquired. He’s also invested in a number of companies as an angel investor and I know of at least a half dozen that have been acquired.

He’s got awesome advice in a blog post titled You have acquisition interest – now what? His 10 step process is:

  1. Assess the acquirer
  2. Notify the board
  3. Set your number
  4. Engage the acquirer
  5. Ask for the ballpark offer
  6. Identify mentors
  7. Assess the ballpark offer
  8. Get to know them and answer their questions.
  9. Push for a term sheet
  10. Decide

Go read the post now. It’s excellent and I plan to refer people to it often whenever this question comes up.

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